Popular Science, R.I.P. (updated!)

Rest in Peace, objective journalism

Image: Vanguard Bears

A shout out to @Stuperb for inspiring this post from an email.

Popular Science magazine has shut off comments on their website. At issue is not the what but the why. The comment has been made repeatedly by others, most recently by Thomas Sowell, that a class of people who cannot fathom they could be wrong seeks to reshape the world, by force if necessary, to match their view.

Since their reshaping has never worked as promised anywhere it’s every been tried in the entire course of human civilization… (not hyperbole, see anyone from Viktor Frankl’s “Man’s Search for Meaning” to the trilogy by Dr. Sowell – can you tell I like his work?)

…these tyrants, sometimes petty, sometimes despotic, are always clamouring for more resources to achieve their aims. Like all tyrants, they’re not interested in dialog, or effectively vetting new ideas, merely assuring predetermined outcomes that agree with their fad-du-jour.)

With this decision, Popular Science has joined the painfully long list of once heralded magazines who have lost their core mission and purpose. Scientific American is another highly visible member of this ignoble club. The masthead of the Economist magazine offers the best comment on the debasing of the intellectual currency with which these two now have to live:

The Economist was first published in September 1843 by James Wilson to “take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress.”

Suzanne LaBarre and others of her ilk are not intelligent, no matter how educated they may be. When this conceit affects even Supreme Court Justices, one wonders if we as a nation are destined for the invectives of Hobbes’ Leviathan.

Carpe Diem!

Matt

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