Adding a QR code to your Events

Every once in a while, industry tools make the jump to mainstream. I think the QR codes are going to be one of those. Unlike the ill-timed Forbes jump into the CueCat, as well as Microsoft’s Tag Reader, QR codes are free to create, free to read and with this technote, hopefully, easy to use. I recommend the Memset-backed link shorteners:

  • is.gd, with no default preview page or
  • v.gd, featuring a preview page set as default,

because of the nice variety of choices they give, in a clean, simple interface. In the steps below, there is a certain class of people who will decry the “extra step” of using the Google shortener only for the QR create step. Their complaint is that the QR code doesn’t need to be a shortened URL.

These folks have never eaten in a restaurant where the table setting includes more than one fork, so you can dismiss their plaintive wails.

1. Create short link with v.gd or is.gd
2. Copy the URL to the end of this preformatted goo.gl string (and hit return). Presto! your code is automatically generated. This QR code says nothing but “PutYourLinkHere” while yours will have your URL embedded in the 2-D barcode.
3. Save the image to file (I use .png) to upload as your “site logo” on your Eventbrite page.

As an alternative (recalling the comment above), Google has made creating codes deliriously simple:

1. Create short link with goo.gl then manually add the letters .qr to the end (in the address bar).
2. Save the image to file (I use .png) to upload as your “site logo” on your Eventbrite page.

The QR Codes section of the Google Chart docs provide more detail.

Here’s the Event QR code for our STETA meetups of 2011:

There are many more uses, this is just a practical yet fun one.

Carpe Diem!

Matt

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

A walk in the forest…

Systems Thinking teaches us how to scale our perspective to study the forest or the trees, while Systems Engineering tells us what to do with the data we find.

Visitors: Where in the World?